It is important to listen, learn, and engage in conversations around issues of systemic racism. But what’s needed most is concrete action. We must move beyond our words and take proactive steps to examine our individual biases, rethink existing systems and structures, and implement plans for a more equitable future. Following are a list of upcoming events and ways to get involved in this work on campus.

Upcoming Events


Exhibition: “Lorraine O’Grady: Both/And

Lorraine O’Grady, Art Is . . . (Girl Pointing), 1983/2009. Chromogenic photograph in 40 parts, 20 × 16 in. (50.8 × 40.64 cm). Edition of 8 plus 1 artist’s proof. Courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates, New York. © Lorraine O’Grady/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Lorraine O’Grady: Both/And, on loan from the Brooklyn Museum in New York, is the first comprehensive overview of the work of Lorraine O’Grady (born in Boston, 1934), one of the most significant figures in contemporary performance, conceptual, and feminist art. O’Grady is widely known for her radical persona Mlle Bourgeoise Noire, and has a complex practice that also encompasses video, photomontage, concrete poetry, cultural criticism, and public art. The artist has consistently been ahead of her time, anticipating contemporary art world conversations about racism, sexism, institutional inequities, and cultural oversights by decades, and her prescience has inspired younger generations of artists.

JAN 8 – APR 30, 2022
2nd Floor: The Bob & Lissa Shelley McDowell Gallery, the Gregory D. Ivy Gallery and Weatherspoon Guild Galleries, and Gallery 6

A Conversation with Lorraine O’Grady

Artist Lorraine O’Grady will talk with acclaimed Durham-based poet, independent scholar, and activist Alexis Pauline Gumbs. This event is generously supported by the Ruth Beesch Lecture Fund.

THURSDAY, MAR 24, 5:30PM, VIRTUAL EVENT

Virtual event, register HERE.




SOUTHEASTERN CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART (SECCA): SPECIAL EXHIBITION WITH GUEST CURATOR DUANE CYRUS

The Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA) is proud to present a special exhibition with guest curator Duane Cyrus, coming to SECCA in Fall 2021. A Bessie Award nominated performer and a professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Duane Cyrus was selected as guest curator for the exhibition from a pool of more than 30 applicants. The exhibition is scheduled to open in mid-November in SECCA’s Main Gallery, and will remain on view through early 2022.


Can Addressing Gender and Racial Disparities in Innovation Unleash Economic Growth?

Dr. Lisa Cook, professor of economics and international relations at Michigan State University, will present the keynote address as part of UNC Greensboro’s Harriet Elliott Lecture Series.

March 29, 2022 | 6:30 p.m. | Elliott University Center Auditorium | 507 Stirling St, Greensboro, NC 27412


University Libraries – Black Lives Matter

In unity with our Black, Indigenous, and People of Color communities we offer you these resources.

Get Involved


  • Triad Black Lives Matter Protest Collection

    The purpose of the Triad Black Lives Matters Collection is to document the BLM movement, police brutality protests, and race relations in the Triad area of North Carolina. The collection contains digital photographs and video footage relating to the Black Lives Matter movement and the George Floyd protests.

    Collecting for the project is ongoing, and the archive is particularly interested in photographs, video, protest signs, clothing, flyers, posters, creative works, etc. Additionally, the archive would like to document local organizations involved with the movement. The material can be historic, originating with the founding of the movement, as well as current. Physical and digital material can be accepted into the collection.

    Submit materials

  • Anti-Racist Resource Guide

    This document was created for use as as a resource for anyone looking to broaden their understanding of anti-racism and who want to get involved to combat racism, specifically as it relates to anti-Blackness and police violence. Within this guide, you will find a variety of resources to explore practical ways to understand, explain, and solve seemingly intractable problems of racial inequity, white supremacy, police violence, and injustice.

    Broaden your understanding

  • Office of Intercultural Engagement

    The Office of Intercultural Engagement (OIE) creates and delivers co-curricular programs to bring all students together for the purpose of deepening and broadening awareness, knowledge and skill around identity, culture, and our interconnected fate. As a unit within the Division of Student Affairs, OIE contributes to the academic mission of UNC Greensboro by collaborating with various campus and community partners to complement and advance institutional goals for diversity, equity, and inclusion.

  • UNCG Libraries – “Don’t Want to Ask”

    This guide is designed to provide meaningful and helpful resources to anyone with questions about material regarding subjects that may be private or otherwise uncomfortable to talk about.

    Find your resources

  • We Here – Black Lives Matter

    Libraries have played a major role in the white racial project of this country. We do not have the luxury of ignoring what is happening because it is happening to us, our family members and loved ones. So we write to you today urging everyone to continue educating yourselves, make a donation, sign a petition, call politicians, and begin a discussion with your fellow staff members. We’ve pulled together a few places you can take action. There are many more, so think of these as a starting place.

    Take action

Racism and Health


CDC’s Commitment to Addressing Racism as an Obstacle to Health Equity

At CDC, we are committed to ensuring every person has the opportunity to live a healthy life. To that end, CDC—as the nation’s leading public health agency—has established this web portal, “Racism and Health” to serve as a hub for our activities, promote a public discourse on how racism negatively affects health and communicate potential solutions. Working with the broader public health community, we will serve as a catalyst to further investigate the impact of racism on health and efforts to achieve health equity for all.

HELP US EXPAND THIS WEBSITE

If you know of an upcoming event or a way to take action, let us know.